Grand Chess Rules

This was my original inspiration for making the 10x10 boards -- although this variant does not remain as true to regular chess as Capa 100 Chess, it still makes for a great game!
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Relayer
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Grand Chess Rules

Post by Relayer » Fri Oct 06, 2017 5:58 pm

(PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to maintain consistency across all variants, we will be using the same name for pieces in each variant (the name that Capablanca used for the pieces). The inventor of Grand Chess uses the term Marshal for the piece that moves like Rook and Knight, and Cardinal for the piece that moves like Rook and Bishop. We will be using the term Chancellor in place of Marshal and Archbishop in place of Cardinal.)

Grand Chess is a large-board chess variant invented by Dutch games designer Christian Freeling in 1984. It is played on a 10×10 board, with each side having two additional pawns and two new pieces: the Chancellor and the Archbishop. The Chancellor combines powers of a rook and a knight, while the Archbishop combines powers of a bishop and a knight.

The pieces are placed on the players' first and second ranks, respectively, with the rooks alone on the players' first ranks. The pawns are placed on the players' third ranks. Since the rooks are not blocked as much by the other pieces as in standard chess, it is easier for them to activate earlier in the game.

Here is the starting position:

StartPositionGrandChess.png

The pieces are placed on the players' first and second ranks, respectively, with the rooks alone on the players' first ranks. The pawns are placed on the players' third ranks. Since the rooks are not blocked as much by the other pieces as in standard chess, it is easier for them to activate earlier in the game.

A pawn that reaches a player's eighth or ninth ranks can elect to either promote or remain a pawn, but it must promote upon reaching the tenth rank. The pawn must be promoted to a piece that has already been captured (unlike in regular chess where a player could theoretically have 9 Queens). In the extremely rare event that there is no piece available, the pawn is not allowed to move to the final rank, but can still give check on an opposing King.

As in standard chess: pawns can move one or two squares on their first move; pawns can capture en passant; checkmate is a win; stalemate is a draw. There is no castling in Grand Chess as there would be no point -- the Rooks are already connected.

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